If you've landed on this blog by mistake, please follow this link:


Please update your bookmarks and the links on your sites.

Join our forum at:

Monday, April 6, 2009

Privacy? What privacy?

The following story reminds me of things I've been hearing over the years about our government. I personally think they're already doing this.
So maybe this post is redundant.
And it looks to me as if Obama is strictly NWO. Never did trust him, but then I don't trust many people anyway.

Using Europe to erode our privacy

An EU directive compelling ISPs to retain information on individuals has been brought in without a debate in parliament
Comments (71)

* Henry Porter
o Henry Porter
o guardian.co.uk, Monday 6 April 2009 12.00 BST
o Article history

As the row over MPs' living expenses has developed, several have expressed the fear that the reputation for parliament and the public's respect for politicians would be irreversibly affected.

They are right to be worried but it is the spectacle of common abuse of housing allowances combined with the failure to defend Britain's liberties from our civil servants and European bureaucrats that is so damaging. MPs' ideas of a sovereign parliament appear to be limited to the retention of their own personal information and the abuse of taxpayers' trust. Forget any notion of MPs standing up to Europe or reigning in an increasingly autonomous civil service.

Today, an EU directive comes into force which will compel all internet service providers to retain information from all emails and website visits. Data from phone calls and text messages will also be stored and made available to the government, its agencies and local authorities. Having seen how local officials have abused anti-terrorist laws, it's not hard to imagine the damage to privacy that will ensure.

These powers were brought in by a statutory instrument and so were not debated by either house. The accepted view is that the Home Office now bypasses parliament by lobbying Europe directly in the knowledge that the measures they desire will go undebated and unscrutinised, then be smuggled into British law as a European directive.

It is difficult to think of anything that makes the House of Commons look more feckless or more redundant.

The Conservatives believe that the law may enable the creation of a massive communications data silo that will store the content of every email and phone call. This has been long desired by the Home Office and GCHQ but the government has failed to bring the interception modernisation programme before parliament, perhaps because the penny is beginning to drop about privacy. And the costs are estimated to be as much as £12bn.

Baroness Neville-Jones said last week in the House of Lords "The government has not been able to satisfy these benches that last week's statutory instrument did not create a vehicle through which the interception modernisation programme could be carried into practice without further primary legislation."

It seems amazing that parliament, now on another long break,­ is not able to establish whether this statutory instrument allows the home secretary, one of the ministers accused of fiddling their housing allowances, to create the data silo without primary legislation and the full debate that the British public must surely require from its elected representatives on such a vital issue.

As of this morning, essential information about your internet activity and phone calls has passed into the hands of government and its agencies and every local government gauleiter who suspects you of challenging his or her authority.

Monday 6 April may be seen as milestone on the way to a police state and the "the hell house" of personal information about which the former DPP Sir Ken Macdonald warned last year. It is certainly a date to remember in the long slide of the standing of MPs, who I very much doubt were even aware of this directive.

1 comment:

Humble wife said...

Yep, times have changed and somewhere along the line, we decided that privacy and personal rights are dependent on the government. sigh

New Hampshire PreppersNetwork Est. Jan 17, 2009 All contributed articles owned and protected by their respective authors and protected by their copyright. New Hampshire Preppers Network is a trademark protected by American Preppers Network Inc. All rights reserved. No content or articles may be reproduced without explicit written permission.